Posted tagged ‘Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder’

May I Have Your Attention Please? Part II

March 1, 2013

[This is the second part of Dr. Lamar’s article on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).  Click here to read Part 1].

[originally published in KCN, April 2003]

Depressed child sittingLast month I brought to your “attention” a disorder which is currently termed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).  Its prevalence has literally skyrocketed over the past decade.  It has affected nearly 4 million children and strangely only seems to occur, for the most part, within the borders of the United States.  It’s a disorder whose diagnosis is often questionable — primarily because there is no way to objectively prove its existence, making it a subjective diagnosis — one of opinion.  Observations of a child exhibiting hyperactivity, impulsiveness, and an inability to pay attention are enough to bring about the label of ADHD.  But perhaps the most questionable aspect of ADHD is the treatment of choice by most doctors:  Ritalin.  It’s a drug that is classified as a Schedule II Drug of the Controlled Substances Act, and is remarkably similar to cocaine.  The side effects are appalling, personalities are being lost, and children are becoming addicts — actually seeking it out in the streets.  Meanwhile, the drug manufacturer’s wallet is getting fatter.  What someone doesn’t want you to know is that there are other treatments available —  other treatments that are effective and will spare your child.

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May I Have Your Attention Please? Part I

February 22, 2013

depressed kid[originally published in KCN, March 2003]

Imagine for a moment a medical disorder — a medical disorder primarily found in children.  This medical disorder is unique, however.  Because unlike most disorders that have lab work-ups, special imaging, fancy tests, or good old-fashioned doctor procedures to verify their diagnoses, this one has none.  The only bit of evidence that exists to support it are the various observations and interviews that the doctor (hopefully) conducts with the involved parties.  In essence, it’s a diagnosis that is totally opinion-based.  Now imagine that the number one treatment for this diagnosis, primarily found in children, that lacks any “hard” clinical evidence for its existence, is a drug very similar to cocaine.  Sound ridiculous?  Well, it’s not.  As a matter of fact, it’s happening every day.

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