Archive for August 2009

Consternation over Constipation

August 28, 2009

Constipation Outhouse

[originally published in KCN, September 2009]

For many of us, going “number 2” is just something we fit into our day.  Not much thought is given to it.  Sure, most of us have experienced an occasional, short-term bout of constipation, perhaps due to a shift in diet, not drinking enough water, or emotional stress.  But unfortunately, the $800 million spent each year in this country for laxatives tells us that for some, constipation is hardly “an occasional bout” — it’s a way of life.

Consider the story of an 8-year-old boy who, since the day he was born, would only experience a bowel movement once every 7 to 10 days — sometimes almost 2 weeks would go by.  And when he would finally “go,” it was a 1 to 2 hour experience in the bathroom that almost always ended up with mom or dad fetching the plunger. (more…)

Up in Smoke

August 21, 2009

[originally published in KCN, March 2000]

smoking-camelI wonder what Joe Camel’s spinal X-rays look like.  Not very pretty in my estimation.  In fact, I’m even starting to question whether he really is  a camel after researching the impact cigarettes can have on the spine.  Perhaps under his cool camel persona lies a spinal deformed horse with a bad nose job.  If so, kudos to the ladies and gentlemen in Joe’s marketing department for fooling us all for so long.

Bad addictionSo what’s up with smoking and spinal health anyway?  Is there a link?  Will the courts order tobacco companies to provide lifetime chiropractic care for their puffing patrons?  Probably not.   After all, the bad habit hasn’t been “conclusively” linked to poor spinal health.  Hmmm.  Nevertheless, the physiology of the spine and pharmacology of the potent chemicals in cigarettes suggests that a connection is very plausible. (more…)

…But wait! There’s more!

August 14, 2009

[originally published in KCN, February 2000]

visceral-but-wait-guyToday it is becoming more and more accepted by the health care community and public at large that chiropractors are great back doctors.  I would agree.  The scientific literature certainly supports our primary method of treatment for back pain, and more insurance companies are covering our services for it.  Considering our history of long uphill battles to gain “acceptance”  as a viable health care profession,  it is understandable that we might be drawn to settle into this “comfortable chair” of being labeled as back pain specialists.  But to do so would really be undermining the true potential that the art, science, and philosophy of chiropractic has to offer. (more…)

Behind the Scenes

August 7, 2009
behindscenes1[While attending chiropractic college in the early 90’s, my wife, Keri, wrote an article about what it was like being married to a chiropractic student.  The article was published in my chiropractic college’s newspaper on two different occasions and received rave reviews — not from my fellow colleagues, but their spouses!  Apparently her story resonated with many.  In any event, this is a rare peek into the making of a chiropractor. —  Dr. Lamar]

[Originally written July 1994 — by Keri Lamar]

I’m out with my husband and he puts his hand on my back.  It doesn’t take long before he is traversing  my spine and muscles.   His fingers stop to push the area a little, and he leans over to whisper in my ear:

“A little stiff here, hon?”

This scenario has happened so often that I just have to laugh about it now.  Gone are the days of the simple touch, the caress.  Tom is now neck deep in chiropractic college and I don’t get touched anymore.  I get palpated.  (more…)

Cost-Effective Strategies When Your Employee is on L and I

August 1, 2009

[originally published in GKCCC Newsletter, May 2009, and then in KCN, Auguast 2009]

Counting moneyIronically, the biggest driver of  costs associated with work injury claims often is not the actual health care rendered to the injured worker, but rather the amount of time-loss wages paid to the worker themselves.  And, for us employers, this usually translates to the ever-dreaded premium hike.  So what’s a cash-strapped employer to do when one of his workers is stricken with a debilitating work injury?
(more…)


%d bloggers like this: