Archive for the ‘prescription drugs’ category

Rx on an Airplane

October 25, 2013

Rx on a plane[originally published in KCN, June 2013]

“Fear lives in our beliefs.” 

That’s what Dr. David Jackson communicated to an assembly of chiropractors — of which I was one — in Seattle several months back.  He went on to say that fear keeps us from telling others what we know we need to tell them because we’re more afraid of what they might say versus what they might not say.  When it comes to sharing chiropractic, he’s more fearful of not telling people than he is at telling them.  He admitted, though, it hadn’t always been that way for him.  But as he began to witness more and more people falling ill and dying, he became too afraid of the results of staying silent.

To illustrate his point, he told us about an encounter he had on the airplane as he was flying up to our meeting.  He explained that he had settled in his chair and was very occupied multitasking between his iPhone, iPad, and MacBook Pro.  Nevertheless, he could sense his seatmate periodically peering into his “mobile office” space.  With Dr. Jackson’s company name, Epic Practice, emblazoned across his screen, it was obvious he was a chiropractor.  And glancing over at her work space, he immediately surmised she worked for a drug company. (more…)

Advertisements

May I Have Your Attention Please? Part II

March 1, 2013

[This is the second part of Dr. Lamar’s article on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).  Click here to read Part 1].

[originally published in KCN, April 2003]

Depressed child sittingLast month I brought to your “attention” a disorder which is currently termed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).  Its prevalence has literally skyrocketed over the past decade.  It has affected nearly 4 million children and strangely only seems to occur, for the most part, within the borders of the United States.  It’s a disorder whose diagnosis is often questionable — primarily because there is no way to objectively prove its existence, making it a subjective diagnosis — one of opinion.  Observations of a child exhibiting hyperactivity, impulsiveness, and an inability to pay attention are enough to bring about the label of ADHD.  But perhaps the most questionable aspect of ADHD is the treatment of choice by most doctors:  Ritalin.  It’s a drug that is classified as a Schedule II Drug of the Controlled Substances Act, and is remarkably similar to cocaine.  The side effects are appalling, personalities are being lost, and children are becoming addicts — actually seeking it out in the streets.  Meanwhile, the drug manufacturer’s wallet is getting fatter.  What someone doesn’t want you to know is that there are other treatments available —  other treatments that are effective and will spare your child.

(more…)

May I Have Your Attention Please? Part I

February 22, 2013

depressed kid[originally published in KCN, March 2003]

Imagine for a moment a medical disorder — a medical disorder primarily found in children.  This medical disorder is unique, however.  Because unlike most disorders that have lab work-ups, special imaging, fancy tests, or good old-fashioned doctor procedures to verify their diagnoses, this one has none.  The only bit of evidence that exists to support it are the various observations and interviews that the doctor (hopefully) conducts with the involved parties.  In essence, it’s a diagnosis that is totally opinion-based.  Now imagine that the number one treatment for this diagnosis, primarily found in children, that lacks any “hard” clinical evidence for its existence, is a drug very similar to cocaine.  Sound ridiculous?  Well, it’s not.  As a matter of fact, it’s happening every day.

(more…)

An Earful

July 17, 2010

[originally published in KCN, December 2002]

With a prevalence second only to that of the common cold, ear infections — more correctly known as “otitis media” in doctor jargon — may just seem like a part of growing up. Doctors estimate that children will have at least one by the time they turn six. Unfortunately, for many the occurrences are quite a bit higher — some as many as 12 in any given year. Perhaps this is why one doctor referred to otitis media as “an occupational hazard of childhood.” Truly though, the “hazard” lies in the common course of the “hamster wheel” medical treatments the majority will face. Aside from “well check ups,” otitis media is the number one reason a child will visit a pediatrician.

(more…)

A Tough Pill to Swallow

April 20, 2009

toughpill-1[originally published in KCN, January 1999]

The newspapers, television, and radio remind us every now and again about the leading causes of death in our society.  So much in fact, that it is pretty much common knowledge that the number one killer in the United States is…you guessed it, heart disease.  Number two and three might take a little more head scratching, but if cancer and stroke come to mind, you’d be correct.  But what about number four?  Nobody ever talks about number FOUR. (more…)


%d bloggers like this: