Archive for the ‘whiplash’ category

The 8 Second Adjustment

February 1, 2013

[originally published in KCN, September 2002 / cartoon provided by TomLamarCartoon.com]

Rodeo Cowboy cartoonThe crowd is tense.  Excitement is in the air.  The gate springs open, and out pops a wild bucking bronco with a cowboy clutched atop.  As the bronco tries with all of its might to rid itself of this odd, restrictive force it senses on its back, the brave cowboy tries with equal might to hang on like glue — body being bumped, jerked, and whipped in every direction imaginable — all while trying to look “good” during this brawl between man and beast.   As the second clock speeds along, the music from the PA system blares, the crowd cheers, and the announcer keeps it all going full throttle.  In what seems like a blink of an eye to the fans — but more like days to the brave cowboy — the eight second buzzer sounds, signaling that his ride is over, and his score awaits.  Hopefully the rescue cowboys will be along soon for an easy dismount.  Of course, the other option is being bucked off, slammed to the ground, and possibly stepped on.  Ahh yes, the rodeo is in town!  And while it only comes once a year to Kitsap County, to the cowboys (and girls) this is just another day at the office.  For while the fans that night will only see these cowboys perform once, chances are, their calendars are booked for two, three, maybe four, different rodeos that week.  How do they do it — again, and again, and again?  For many, the answer is chiropractic.

(more…)

TMJ and the Chiropractor

May 28, 2010

[originally published in KCN, June 2010]

There I sat in the dental waiting room, flipping through a magazine as my toe kept time to the Muzak.  Suddenly, the young dentist poked his head out from behind the door and called my name. He looked worried.  And to tell you the truth, I began to feel the same way — because I wasn’t there to be seen.  It was my wife’s turn in the chair, and I was only waiting.

(more…)

Torticollis

February 26, 2010

Spinal Column Radio Torticollis Podcast[originally published in KCN, March 2010]

Torticollis. While it might sound like a strange Italian dish, it’s not.  Imagine waking up one morning with your ear pressed to your shoulder as if cradling a telephone receiver.  The only problem is, there is no telephone to be found  — only an unrelenting, painful neck spasm with absolutely no ability to bring your head back to any semblance of socially accepted posture.  Most would agree, it’s a pretty disturbing situation to find yourself in.  Thankfully, in most cases, the “fix” for torticollis can be as simple as a visit to your local chiropractor. (more…)

Steer Clear of Neck Braces

November 27, 2009

[originally published in KCN, December 2009]

Cervical Soft CollarEver so often I will spot someone wearing a brace around their neck. To be clear, I’m not talking about the rigid neck braces that EMT’s and paramedics employ to stabilize a suspected neck injury when they arrive on an accident scene. I’m talking about the soft, usually white, neck-supporting collars that are worn by people who are suffering from neck pain. These devices are often prescribed by well-meaning doctors, or are purchased by patients themselves at local pharmacies as a form of self-care for neckache. And while they look official, the irony is that they don’t do a bit of good. In fact, according to most research, they actually do more harm than good!

(more…)

Railway Spine

September 18, 2009

railway-train-flip[originally published in KCN, May 2000]

Back in the “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman” days people suffering from neck pain following train accidents would likely have been diagnosed, or “labeled” I should say, with the downgrading term “railway spine.”  You see, railway spine was a condition that garnered a lot of suspicion, as the genuineness of the suffering patients exhibited was questionable to some.  Unlike other possible aches and pains a person of this era may have experienced, like falling off his horse, this condition was different, in that it involved a liable party — the railroad company — putting the patient in a position of gaining some extra gold nuggets for his pouch.

Fast forward to Y2K.  Ironically, not a lot has changed — except we don’t use gold as common currency, and the term railway spine no longer exists.  It was retired a long time ago — upgraded to a term most of us are more familiar with:  “whiplash.”  Perhaps this change in verbiage was prompted by the fact that automobiles have replaced trains as our primary method of transportation.  With 6 million injuries per year due to automobile accidents — 50% resulting in whiplash-type injuries — it is a rare day when a patient walks into the doctor’s office with whiplash following an Amtrak incident. (more…)


%d bloggers like this: